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Title: Security warning: Disable Java

  1. #1
    hhhenry is offline Master Gamer
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    Default Security warning: Disable Java

    Find out more Java security warning from US MyBroadband.co17 hours ago The US Department of Homeland Security warned Thursday that a flaw in Java software is so dangerous that people should stop using it. “This vulnerability is being ... Security Warning: Disable Java Now securitywatch.pcmag.com/.../302019-security-warning-disable-java-now Java was once touted as the "write once, run anywhere" language. In theory, a single Java program could run on any Java-supporting platform. That dream never quite ... I disabled the Java plugins on Firefox (my regular browser) and logged on here and on to FR. Everything works so far

  2. #2
    hhhenry is offline Master Gamer
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    Default Re: Security warning: Disable Java

    Well, everything worked until I rebooted. Now, the FR sites don't work without Java, even to report the problem. (I just enabled Java to do that) Hopefully, SOE will fix that real soon. Until then, there is a serious risk -- Homeland Security say's the risk, among others is Identity Theft AND there are already sites that can do it.

  3. #3
    hhhenry is offline Master Gamer
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    Default Re: Security warning: Disable Java

    The news on this just gets worse. I've put in a ticket. I've decided it's just to risky to play until SOE fixes it. U.S. warns on Java software as security concerns escalate Reuters By Jim Finkle | Reuters ­ 19 hrs ago (Reuters) - The U.S. Department of Homeland Security urged computer users to disable Oracle Corp's Java software, amplifying security experts' prior warnings to hundreds of millions of consumers and businesses that use it to surf the Web. Hackers have figured out how to exploit Java to install malicious software enabling them to commit crimes ranging from identity theft to making an infected computer part of an ad-hoc network of computers that can be used to attack websites. "We are currently unaware of a practical solution to this problem," the Department of Homeland Security's Computer Emergency Readiness Team said in a posting on its website late on Thursday. "This and previous Java vulnerabilities have been widely targeted by attackers, and new Java vulnerabilities are likely to be discovered," the agency said. "To defend against this and future Java vulnerabilities, disable Java in Web browsers." Oracle declined on Friday to comment on the warning. Java is a computer language that enables programmers to write software utilizing just one set of code that will run on virtually any type of computer, including ones that use Microsoft Corp's Windows, Apple Inc's OS X and Linux, an operating system widely employed by corporations. Computer users access Java programs through modules, or plug-ins, that run Java software on top of browsers such as Internet Explorer and Firefox. The U.S. government's warning on Java came after security experts warned on Thursday of the newly discovered flaw. It is relatively rare for government agencies to advise computer users to completely disable software due to a security bug, particularly in the case of widely used programs such as Java. They typically recommend taking steps to mitigate the risk of attack while manufacturers prepare an update, or hold off on publicizing the problem until an update is prepared. In September, the German government advised the public to temporarily stop using Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser to give it time to patch a security vulnerability that opened it to attacks. Java is so widely used that the software has become a prime target for hackers. Last year Oracle's Java surpassed Adobe Systems Inc's Reader software as the most frequently attacked piece of software, according to security software maker Kaspersky Lab. Java was responsible for 50 percent of all cyber attacks last year in which hackers broke into computers by exploiting software bugs, according Kaspersky. That was followed by Adobe Reader, which was involved in 28 percent of all incidents. Microsoft Windows and Internet Explorer were involved in about 3 percent of incidents, according to the survey. The Department of Homeland Security said attackers could trick targets into visiting malicious websites that would infect their PCs with software capable of exploiting the bug in Java. It said an attacker could also infect a legitimate website by uploading malicious software that would infect machines of computer users who trust that site because they have previously visited it without experiencing any problems. They said developers of several popular tools, known as exploit kits, which criminal hackers use to attack PCs, have added software that allows hackers to exploit the newly discovered bug in Java to attack computers. Security experts have been scrutinizing the safety of Java since a similar security scare in August, which prompted some of them to advise using the software only on an as-needed basis. At the time they advised businesses to allow their workers to use Java browser plug-ins only when prompted for permission by trusted programs such as GoToMeeting, a Web-based collaboration tool from Citrix Systems Inc. Java suffered another setback in October when Apple began removing old versions of the software from Internet browsers of Mac computers when its customers installed new versions of its OS X operating system. Apple did not provide a reason for the change and both companies declined to comment at the time. Adam Gowdiak, a researcher with Polish security firm Security Explorations, told Reuters he believes that Oracle fails to properly test its software fixes for security flaws. "It's definitely safer for users to stay away from Java 'til Oracle starts taking security seriously," he said. (Reporting by Jim Finkle; Editing by Dan Grebler) U.S. warns on Java software as security concerns escalate - Yahoo! News

  4. #4
    Overlord Joshua's Avatar
    Overlord Joshua is offline Master Gamer
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    Default Re: Security warning: Disable Java

    TY for this info.

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  5. #5
    Lazarus Swiftbreeze's Avatar
    Lazarus Swiftbreeze is offline Master Gamer
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    Default Re: Security warning: Disable Java

    Just saw this on the news on television, I hope it gets fixed soon!


    If you use Google Chrome like I do, I found out that Java is hidden very well in the Settings. If you are having trouble finding Java, just do this:
    1.Go to "Settings."
    2.At the bottom of "Settings," click on "Show advanced settings."
    3.Under "Privacy," click "Content Settings."
    4.Scroll down until you see "Plugins." Once you find that, click on "Disable individual plug-ins..."
    5.Disable Java.
    Last edited by Lazarus Swiftbreeze; 01-13-2013 at 03:14 AM.

    If you believe in Jesus Christ as your Savior and aren't afraid to admit it, put this in
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  6. #6
    hhhenry is offline Master Gamer
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    Default Re: Security warning: Disable Java

    Oracle (the owner of Java) says they will have a fix by Tuesday. I will wait - this is the most dangerous thing to happen to the Inet in a long time. I will wait until others (e.g. Homeland Security) decide that it's fixed and even then do a daily search on 'Java' to see if anything else has happened. UPDATE Oracle changed that from Tuesday to "Shortly". This could take a while. That's what Homeland Security thought.
    Last edited by hhhenry; 01-13-2013 at 06:25 PM.

  7. #7
    hhhenry is offline Master Gamer
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    Default Re: Security warning: Disable Java

    Oracle says Java is fixed; feds maintain warning By RYAN NAKASHIMA | Associated Press ­ 19 hrs ago [It's still bad - leave it OFF. That also means I still can't log on and play] LOS ANGELES (AP) — Oracle Corp. said Monday it has released a fix for the flaw in its Java software that raised an alarm from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security last week. Even after the patch was issued, the federal agency continued to recommend that users disable Java in their Web browsers. "This and previous Java vulnerabilities have been widely targeted by attackers, and new Java vulnerabilities are likely to be discovered," DHS said Monday in an updated alert published on the website of its Computer Emergency Readiness Team. "To defend against this and future Java vulnerabilities, consider disabling Java in Web browsers until adequate updates are available." The alert follows on the department's warning late Thursday. Java allows programs to run within websites and powers some advertising networks. Users who disable Java may not be able to see portions of websites that display real-time data such as stock prices, graphical menus, weather updates and ads. Vulnerability in the latest version, Java 7, was "being actively exploited," the department said. Java 7 was released in 2011. Oracle said installing its "Update 11" will fix the problem. Security experts said that special code to take advantage of the weakness is being sold on the black market through so-called "Web exploit packs" to Internet abusers who can use it to steal credit card data, personal information or cause other harm. The packs, sold for upwards of $1,500 apiece, make complex hacker codes available to relative amateurs. This particular flaw even enables hackers to compromise legitimate websites by taking over ad networks. The result: users are redirected to malicious sites where damaging software can be loaded onto their computers. The sale of the packs means malware exploiting the security gap is "going to be spread across the Internet very quickly," said Liam O'Murchu, a researcher with Symantec Corp. "If you have the opportunity to turn it off, you should." Oracle said it released two patches — to address the flaw highlighted by the government, as well as another flaw that the government said was "different but equally severe." As well, the patches set Java's default security level to "high" so that users will automatically be shown a prompt and given a chance to decline malicious software before it loads onto their computers. Disabling Java completely in browsers has a similar effect, however. When websites appear without crucial functions, users can click a button to turn Java back on. Making users aware when Java programs are about to be installed gives users a 50/50 chance of avoiding malware, said Kurt Baumgartner, a senior security researcher with Kaspersky Lab. Many programmers are avoiding Java altogether, and its use in Web browsers is on the decline, he said. Kaspersky Lab estimated that last year 50 percent of all website exploitations were due to vulnerabilities in Java. Adobe's Acrobat Reader accounted for another 28 percent of vulnerabilities.

  8. #8
    DespicableDani's Avatar
    DespicableDani is offline Master Gamer
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    Default Re: Security warning: Disable Java

    Double and triple posting isn't allowed :I
    You can edit your posts by hitting the "edit post" button in the
    right hand corner of your post.
    My adventure ends here.

  9. #9
    Tech Geargrinder's Avatar
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    Default Re: Security warning: Disable Java

    I'm sorry henry but I'm not reading those posts. Just looking at them hurts my eyes. So could someone explain to me IN SHORT what is wrong with Java?
    Kayopuro likes this.
    " You didnt see me.... I wasn't here..... You didn't hear anything..."

  10. #10
    KAnnamaria's Avatar
    KAnnamaria is offline Pro Gamer
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    Default Re: Security warning: Disable Java

    Quote Originally Posted by Tech Geargrinder View Post
    I'm sorry henry but I'm not reading those posts. Just looking at them hurts my eyes. So could someone explain to me IN SHORT what is wrong with Java?
    Same with me. Its WAY too long I don't use the news.
    It was fun playing with you guys! Ilysm!



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